• ABC Consumer Confidence (Weekly) – Composed of personal finance, buying climate and consumers’ assessment of the economy, ABC Consumer Confidence measures consumer sentiment towards the state of the economy.
  • Advance Retail Sales (Monthly) – Adjusted estimated monthly retail and food services sales by kinds of business.
  • Average Hourly Earnings (Monthly) – Average hourly earnings of production of non-supervisory workers on private non-farm payrolls by industry. Average hourly earnings reveal the basic hourly rate for major industries as indicated in non-farm payrolls.
  • Average Weekly Hours (Monthly) – Average weekly hours of production of non-supervisory workers on private non-farm payrolls by industry. Seasonally-adjusted.
  • Building Permits (Monthly) – This index is the privately owned residential housing units authorized by building permits. It is a seasonally-adjusted annual rate in thousands of units and it includes 1 unit, 2 unit, 3 & 4 units, and 5 or more units. These totals are also broken up into regions Northeast, Midwest, South and West. This data comes from the U.S. Commerce Department’s Bureau of the Census.
  • Business Inventories (Monthly) – The dollar amount of inventories held by manufacturers, wholesalers, and retailers. The level of inventories in relation to sales is an important indicator of the near-term direction of production activity.
  • Capacity Utilization (Monthly) – Capacity utilization is calculated for the manufacturing, mining, and electric and gas utilities industries. For a given industry, the utilization rate is equal to an output index divided by a capacity index. Output is measured by seasonally adjusted indexes of industrial production. The capacity indexes attempt to capture the concept of sustainable practical capacity, which is defined as the greatest level of output that a plant can maintain within the framework of a realistic work schedule, taking account of normal downtime, and assuming sufficient availability of inputs to operate the machinery and equipment in place. On December 5, 2002 the Federal Reserve published a revision to Industrial Production. The revised estimates will be classified according to the 2002 North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS); previously, the estimates were classified according the 1987 Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system.
  • Change in Non-Farm Payrolls (Monthly) – A measure of the number of people employed by companies and government. The Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics surveys approximately 390,000 establishments to count the number of people employed each month, and the change from the previous month in the number of employed people is reported as the Change in Non-farm Payrolls. Non-farm Payroll generally rises during economic growth and falls during economic decline.
  • Change in Manufacturing Payrolls (Monthly)
  • Chicago Purchasing Manager (Monthly) – The Chicago Purchasing Managers Index is a monthly index of regional (Midwestern) manufacturing activity. Compiled by the Purchasing Managers Association of Chicago, the index is released on the last day of every month for that month. An index reading higher than 50 means manufacturers reporting improved business outnumbered those reporting deteriorating conditions.
  • Consumer Credit (Monthly) – The dollar value of consumer installment credit outstanding. Changes in consumer credit indicate the state of consumer finances and portend future spending patterns. This index covers most short-term and intermediate-term credit extended to individuals, excluding loans secured by real estate. This index is taken from the G.19 report disseminated by the Federal Reserve.
  • Consumer Price Index (Monthly) – Base Year 1982-84=100. The CPI represents changes in prices of all goods and services purchased for consumption by urban households. User fees (such as water and sewer service) and sales and excise taxes paid by the consumer are also included. Income taxes and investment items (i.e. stocks, bonds, and life insurance) are not included. CPI for urban consumers includes expenditures by urban wage earners and clerical workers, professional, managerial, and technical workers, the self-employed, short-term workers, the unemployed, retirees and others not in the labor force. This represents about 80% of the total U.S. population.
  • CPI Ex Food & Energy (Monthly) – The Consumer Price Index minus the total price of food & energy. 1982=100.
  • Construction Spending (Monthly) – The dollar value of new construction activity on residential, non-residential, and public projects put in place in the US, adjusted at annual rates.
  • Continuing Claims (Weekly) – Also known as insured unemployment. This is the actual number of individuals who are unemployed and are currently receiving unemployment benefits. This is the number of people who filed for unemployment benefits at least two weeks ago. To file a claim you must be eligible and meet five (5) guidelines.
    • Meet the requirements of time worked during a 1 year period (full time or not).
    • Become unemployed through no fault of your own (cannot be fired).
    • Must be able to work; no physical or mental holdbacks.
    • Must be available for work.
    • Must be actively seeking work.
  • Current Account Balance (Quarterly) – The current account measures the U.S.’s international trade balance in goods, services, and unilateral transfers on a quarterly basis. The levels of exports, imports and the current account indicate trends in foreign trade.
  • Domestic Vehicle Sales (Monthly) – Adjusted total annual sales and leases of all domestic new automobiles and trucks to both consumers and businesses. The monthly sales are multiplied by the SAAR factors (Seasonally Adjusted Annualized Selling Rate) provided by the Department of Commerce. The SAAR factors adjust for seasonal changes in sales and annualize the figures, making comparisons of the monthly data more meaningful.
  • Durables Ex Transportation (Monthly) – Durables Goods Orders less the consumer spending on transportation.
  • Durable Goods Orders (Monthly) – A measure of consumer spending on long-term purchases, products that are expected to last more than three years. It is intended to offer a gauge of the future of the manufacturing industry. The reports are broken down by industry, which helps to eliminate the effects of single volatile industries like defense spending.
  • Empire Manufacturing (Monthly) – The Empire State Manufacturing Survey is a monthly survey of manufacturers in New York State conducted by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Participants from across the state in a variety of industries respond to a questionnaire and report the change in a variety of indicators from the previous month. Respondents also state the likely direction of these same indicators six months ahead. April 2002 is the first report, although survey data date back to July 2001. Each month, new data will be released and the previous month’s data will be revised slightly. Once per year, all data will undergo a benchmark revision.
  • Existing Home Sales (Monthly) – Existing home sales tally the number of previously constructed homes, condominium and co-ops in which a sale closed during the month. Existing homes (also known as home resales) account for a larger share of the market than new homes and indicate housing market trends. (National Association of Realtors).
  • Factory Orders (Monthly) – Factory orders represent the dollar level of new orders for both durable and nondurable goods. This report gives more complete information than the advance durable goods report which is released one or two weeks earlier in the month.
  • Fed’s Beige Book – The Beige Book is a summary of commentary on Current Economic conditions by the Federal Reserve District. Commonly known as the Beige Book, this report is published eight times per year and is used as a basis of discussion at the upcoming FOMC meeting, which is about 2 weeks after. Each Federal Reserve Bank gathers anecdotal information on current economic conditions in its District through reports from Bank and Branch Directors and interviews with key business contracts, economists, market experts, and other sources. The Beige Book summarizes this information by District and sector.
  • Leading Indicators (Monthly) – A composite index of ten economic indicators that typically lead overall economic activity. These include:
    • Average weekly hours, manufacturing
    • Average weekly initial jobless claims
    • Manufacturers’ new orders, consumer
    • Vendor performance, slower deliveries
    • Manufacturers’ new orders, capital
    • Building permits, new private housing units
    • Stock prices, 500 common stocks
    • Money supply, M2
    • Interest rate spread
    • Index of consumer expectations
  • MBA Mortgage Applications (Weekly) – The Mortgage Bankers’ Association compiles various mortgage loan indexes. The purchase applications index measures applications at mortgage lenders. This is a leading indicator for single-family home sales, re-financings, and housing construction.
  • Money Supply (Monthly) – The monetary aggregates are alternative measures of the money supply by degree of liquidity. Changes in the monetary aggregates indicate the thrust of monetary policy as well as the outlook for economic activity and inflationary pressures.
  • Monthly Budget Statement (Monthly) – This item is reported in the monthly Treasury statement of Receipts and Outlays of the US Government. This statement summarizes the financial activities of the Federal Government and off-budget federal entities conducted in accordance with the budget of the US Government, i.e. receipts and outlays of funds, surplus or deficit, and the means of financing the deficit or disposing of the surplus. Information is presented on a modified cash basis: receipts are accounted for on the basis of collections; refunds of receipts are treated as deductions from gross receipts; revolving and management fund receipts; reimbursements refunds of monies previously expended are treaded as deductions from gross outlay; interest on public debt is recognized on the accrual basis. Major sources include accounting data reported by federal entities, disbursing officers, and Federal Reserve banks.
  • Motor Vehicle Sales (Monthly) – Individual automakers (including foreign & domestic makes) report unit sales of domestically-produced cars and light duty trucks (including sport utility vehicles and mini-vans). Motor vehicle sales are good indicators of trends in consumer spending.
  • NAHB Housing Market Index (Monthly) – The National Association of Home Builders Market Index is a seasonally adjusted index based on a monthly survey of home builders of single-family detached homes and is comprised of three survey components: present sales, six month sales expectations, and traffic of prospective buyers. The index results range between one and 100, with one being the worst and 100 being the best. A reading over 50 suggests more survey participants are seeing “good” economic conditions than “poor” ones for home sales.
  • Net Foreign Security Purchases (Monthly) – Net foreign purchases of US securities.
  • New Home Sales (Monthly) – New one-family housing units total sold data with seasonally-adjusted annual rates, put out by the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of the Census and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The level of new home sales indicates housing market trends and, in turn, economic momentum and consumer purchases of furniture and appliances.
  • Non-Farm Productivity (Quarterly) – Output per hour of all persons in the non-farm business sector. Percent change compounded at annual rate from the original data rather than index numbers. All productivity and cost data was revised in February 2004 as the BLS switched from the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system to the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).
  • Personal Consumption Expenditure (Quarterly) – Those funds spent on goods and services targeted for individual consumption. This data is seasonally-adjusted annual rates.
  • Personal Income (Monthly) – Personal income is the income received by persons from all sources, that is, from participation in production, from both government and business transfer payments, and from government interest. ‘Persons’ consist of individuals, nonprofit institutions that primarily serve individuals, private noninsured welfare funds, and private trust funds. Personal income is calculated as the sum of wage and salary disbursements, other labor income, proprietors’ income with inventory valuation and capital consumption adjustments, rental income of persons with capital consumption adjustments, personal dividend income, personal interest income, and transfer payments to persons, less personal contributions for social insurance. Disposable personal income is personal income less tax & non-tax payments.
  • Personal Spending (Monthly) – Personal consumption expenditures by major type of product.
  • Philadelphia Fed (Monthly) – The general conditions index from this business outlook survey is a diffusion index of manufacturing conditions within the Philadelphia Federal Reserve district. This survey, widely followed as an indicator of manufacturing sector trends, is correlated with the ISM manufacturing index and the index of industrial production.
  • Producer Price Index (Monthly) – Producer Price Indices (PPI) measure average changes in prices received by domestic producers of commodities in all stages of processing. Most information used in calculating the indices is obtained through the systematic sampling of nearly every industry in the manufacturing and mining sectors of the economy. The PPI program also includes some information from other sectors – agriculture, fishing, forestry, services, and gas & electric. Producer Price Indices are designed to measure only the change in prices received for the output of domestic industries, therefore imports are not included. The sample currently includes about 3,200 commodities and 80,000 quotations per month.
  • PPI Ex Food & Energy (Monthly) – The Producer Price Index minus the total price to produce food & energy. 1982=100.
  • Retail Sales (Monthly) – A measure of the total receipts at stores that sell durable and nondurable goods. Consumer spending accounts for two-thirds of GDP and is therefore a key element in economic growth.
  • Retail Sales Less Autos (Monthly) – Adjusted estimated monthly retail and food services sales by kinds of business excluding motor vehicles and parts dealers.
  • Total Vehicle Sales (Monthly) – Adjusted total annual sales and leases of all domestic and imported new automobiles and trucks to both consumers and businesses. The monthly sales are multiplied by the SAAR factors (Seasonally Adjusted Annualized Selling Rate) provided by the Department of Commerce. The SAAR factors adjust for seasonal changes in sales and annualize the figures, making comparisons of the monthly data more meaningful.
  • Trade Balance (Monthly) – The country’s exports minus its imports.
  • Unemployment Rate (Monthly) – The unemployment rate represents the number unemployed persons as a percent of the labor force. Each month approximately 60,000 sample households are interviewed (a portion is done via telephone) during the week that includes the 12th of the month.
  • U of Michigan Confidence (Monthly) – A survey of consumer attitudes concerning both the present situation as well as expectations regarding economic conditions conducted by the University of Michigan. For the preliminary release, approximately three hundred consumers are surveyed while five hundred are interviewed for the final figure. The level of consumer sentiment is related to the strength of consumer spending. This report is released twice per month – the first is a preliminary figure while the second is the final (revised) figure. Base year 1966=100.
  • Wholesale Inventories (Monthly) – The inventories of goods held by U.S. wholesalers. The wholesale trade report includes sales and inventory statistics from the second stage of the manufacturing process. The sales figures say close to nothing about personal consumption and therefore do not move the market. The wholesale inventories sometimes swing enough to change the aggregate inventory profile (aggregate inventory is the sum of inventory at the manufacturing, wholesale, and retail levels), which may affect the GDP outlook. In that event, they can elicit a small market reaction. More often than not, however, this release goes unnoticed except by market economists.